Month: June 2018

Modifying a Car

www.AutoVillage.co.uk

  • Make sure that you have all your tools on hand. This includes sandpaper, electric sandpaper, masking tape, newspapers, air compressors, and spray guns. Also consider weather conditions such as sunshine, wind, and rain.
  • Make sure that you have the correct chemicals for the paint such as thinners, primer, undercoat, and top coat. All these are necessary to prolong the life of the paint job.
  • Remove all the dust in your work area to prevent particles from landing on the wet paint. Particles will destroy the smooth finish. You also need to clean the car to remove all grease and road contaminants.
  • Never forget to wear a face mask, goggles and gloves to avoid getting the chemicals on your skin. These items will also protect you from the particles that come off when you sand current enamel off the Used Cars.
  • Sand the car in circular motions for a uniform surface. The more uniform the better the end result. Once you have finished with sanding the chassis, apply thinners onto a cloth and wipe the surface. Thinners will get the remaining paint off.
  • Priming the surface provides a good base coat to prolong the life of the paint job. It

Mobile Auto Detailing

A little soap is good for the environment, but we are not allowed to let soap run into a storm drain. While it is true that there are harsh chemicals and detergents that are currently used by industry and homeowners that should never be allowed free to run into our ecosystem, most basic soap won’t hurt anything. As a matter of fact, they actually help break down other unwanted contaminants so they can be further filtered by mother earth’s soil and diluted by her abundant water. Most mobile auto detailer’s soaps are perfectly harmless. Unfortunately, no matter how good or biodegradable these soaps are, the law reads nothing but ‘domestic potable water’ goes into the storm drains.

Non-spray products such as silicon for bumpers, wax, adhesive remover, etc. are major environmental problems because they contain dastardly chemicals. You must realize these chemicals do not go into the environment during the washing of the vehicle; therefore, they do not constitute a pollution discharge. Whatever you do, do not pour out a 55-gallon drum of this type product into the gutter in front of your house.

Here is a sad story of what happens when there is an unscrupulous manufacturer tries to …

Clean a Car Battery

  • You will need to determine the configuration of the terminals as there are different types. Determining the configuration will help you to pick the correct wrench to loosen the nuts that keep the cables in place.
  • Now, you need to unfasten the cables (negative and positive respectively) from their posts. Twisting might be necessary to release the cable as they might have been put on quite tightly.
  • Before continuing with the process, checking for leaks and cracks is a must. Car batteries lose acid and could corrode the rest of the components of the engine. If you do see any cracks or leaks, the battery must be replaced.
  • Cables and clamps could also have cracks along the wiring. They could easily be replaced with new parts.
  • This is the part where a basic household item is required to clean the battery: baking soda. The ratio to mix baking soda and hot water in a small container is 1:17. This is usually a tablespoon of baking soda and a cup of hot water.
  • Then it is time for the scrubbing and cleaning. A toothbrush would be ideal for this process so that your hands don’t come into contact with the battery.

Paint Protection Film

Now, there are preventative measures, such as ensuring it’s well maintained, cleaning it, and driving carefully. But, what about factors you can’t control. For instance, a small piece of gravel that’s been kicked up by a semi-trailer, and ricochets off your bonnet, or roof, or mirror, or any part. This is where paint protection film steps in. Its purpose is similar to that of bulletproof glass (please do not shoot at a car with paint protection film). It’s job is to absorb the impact by acting as a barrier. Its composition is made up of a polyurethane film, not too far off the stuff used on armoured glass. The use of paint protection film is to ensure that little to no harm comes to your vehicle. I mean, it’s not going to protect you if you another car slams into you at 60km/h. That job is reserved for your seatbelt and airbags. It will, however, stop those unruly scratches, stone chips, and even minor abrasions. It even protects your paint work from pollutants and contaminants, such as bird droppings, tree sap, dirt, dust and other unfavourable things that could damage your paint. Paint protection film can save you a tonne …