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Monthly Archives: June 2018

Modifying a Car

  • Make sure that you have all your tools on hand. This includes sand paper, electric sandpaper, masking tape, newspapers, air compressors and spray guns. Also consider weather conditions such as sunshine, wind and rain.
  • Make sure that you have the correct chemicals for the paint such as thinners, primer, undercoat and top coat. All these are necessary to prolong the life of the paint job.
  • Remove all the dust in your work area to prevent particles landing on the wet paint. Particles will destroy the smooth finish. You also need to clean the car to remove all grease and road contaminants.
  • Never forget to wear a face mask, goggles and gloves to avoid getting the chemicals on your skin. These items will also protect you from the particles that come off when you sand current enamel off the car.
  • Sand the car in circular motions for a uniform surface. The more uniform the better the end result. Once you have finished with sanding the chassis, apply thinners onto a cloth and wipe the surface. Thinners will get the remaining paint off.
  • Priming the surface provides a good base coat to prolong the life of the paint job. It also helps to set the chemicals for an even finish. If you don’t want a specific section of the car to be painted, cover those areas with masking tape or newspaper.
  • Apply thin layers of primer and paint so that clumps and drops don’t form. Thinner coats will set quicker and allow you to add another coat on top without unsightly formations.
  • Follow all the rations mentioned on the instructions of the paint packages. There might be a different amount of chemicals that need to be mixed with the right amount of thinners.

Mobile Auto Detailing

A little soap is good for the environment, but we are not allowed to let soap run into a storm drain. While it is true that there are harsh chemicals and detergents that are currently used by industry and homeowners that should never be allowed free to run into our ecosystem, most basic soap won’t hurt anything. As a matter of fact, they actually help break down other unwanted contaminants so they can be further filtered by mother earth’s soil and diluted by her abundant water. Most mobile auto detailer’s soaps are perfectly harmless. Unfortunately, no matter how good or biodegradable these soaps are, the law reads nothing but ‘domestic potable water’ goes into the storm drains.

Non-spray products such as silicon for bumpers, wax, adhesive remover, etc. are major environmental problems because they contain dastardly chemicals. You must realize these chemicals do not go into the environment during the washing of the vehicle; therefore, they do not constitute a pollution discharge. Whatever you do, do not pour out a 55-gallon drum of this type product into the gutter in front of your house.

Here is a sad story of what happens when there is an unscrupulous manufacturer tries to sell a product that is not safe:

A company that touted their product as being safe for the environment sold it to thousands of retailers that had thousands of outlets. It was on shelves all over America for about three years. It was in the garages of over forty million households. It was later discovered by a company that preps boats for painting and stripping that the product killed fish. Fish were floating to the surface dead each day that this product was used. The company cleaning the boats didn’t want to get in trouble, so they switched products and didn’t say anything. The new product worked fine and no more dead fish.

About a year and a half later, the supplier for the new product went out of business and the boat company was forced to switch back to the first product. Guess what? That’s right; more dead fish; even more than before. This time the boat cleaning company told someone. The Fish and Game Department slapped on a lawsuit for one million dollars. The product manufacturer paid but continued to make the product with same formula. Other government agencies and environmental groups caught wind and forced the company to change the formula. The price increase to change the formula cost the company eight cents more per bottle on a retail price of $10.00. The one million dollars was less than eight cents per gallon, so they just paid it. When they finally switched formulas due to the pressure from environmental consumers and the negative media, the bottle said “New and Improved” and “Even More Environmentally Safe Than Before.” The price increased an average of $1.99 retail. The product’s name? I am not writing this article to hurt brand names so we will leave it at that, you can figure it out through public record.

Clean a Car Battery

  • You will need to determine the configuration of the terminals as there are different types. Determining the configuration will help you to pick the correct wrench to loosen the nuts that keep the cables in place.
  • Now, you need to unfasten the cables (negative and positive respectively) from their posts. Twisting might be necessary to release the cable as they might have been put on quite tightly.
  • Before continuing with the process, checking for leaks and cracks is a must. Car batteries lose acid and could corrode the rest of the components of the engine. If you do see any cracks or leaks, the battery must be replaced.
  • Cables and clamps could also have cracks along the wiring. They could easily be replaced with new parts.
  • This is the part where a basic household item is required to clean the battery: baking soda. The ratio to mix baking soda and hot water in a small container is 1:17. This is usually a tablespoon of baking soda and a cup of hot water.
  • Then it is time for the scrubbing and cleaning. A toothbrush would be ideal for this process so that your hands don’t come into contact with the battery.
  • Dip the toothbrush into the baking soda and hot water mixture, and scrub away at the corrosion build up. Usually the clamps and cable posts contain the most build up and will need the maximum amount of cleaning.
  • Once all the corrosion is off, it is an absolute necessity to rinse away any baking soda and loose corrosion with cool water.
  • The battery has to be completely dry before replacing the cables and clamps to avoid short circuiting the system.

Paint Protection Film

Now, there are preventative measures, such as ensuring it’s well maintained, cleaning it, and driving carefully. But, what about factors you can’t control. For instance, a small piece of gravel that’s been kicked up by a semi-trailer, and ricochets off your bonnet, or roof, or mirror, or any part. This is where paint protection film steps in. Its purpose is similar to that of bulletproof glass (please do not shoot at a car with paint protection film). It’s job is to absorb the impact by acting as a barrier. Its composition is made up of a polyurethane film, not too far off the stuff used on armoured glass. The use of paint protection film is to ensure that little to no harm comes to your vehicle. I mean, it’s not going to protect you if you another car slams into you at 60km/h. That job is reserved for your seatbelt and airbags. It will, however, stop those unruly scratches, stone chips, and even minor abrasions. It even protects your paint work from pollutants and contaminants, such as bird droppings, tree sap, dirt, dust and other unfavourable things that could damage your paint. Paint protection film can save you a tonne of money in the long run. While more affordable alternatives, namely ceramic coating, are available, they do not provide the protection against scratches and rock chips. Paint protection film does.